Digital Citizenship

What is Digital Citizenship? How is this addressed in school? What should I do as a parent? Digital Citizenship is the concept of developing foundational habits of mind to use technology safely, responsibly and ethically, while still leveraging the benefits of collaborating and communicating in a globally connected world.

At CDS, conversations begin as early as Grade 1 with our students in the primary MacLab incorporating Digital Citizenship as an integrated part of our lessons on character development. We begin by focusing on respect for each other, what it means to be safe on the web, and how we can take care of ourselves and others online. More advanced topics are scaffolded into later Junior School grades, including:
  • sharing personal information online
  • cyberbullying
  • the power of words without faces
  • digital footprints
  • technology and health
  • online “friend”ships
  • validating content
  • digital rights and responsibilities
A variety of strategies are employed, including curated web resources, student-inspired classroom discussions and our recent Breakout! EDU classroom activity.

As our Parent Association guest speaker, Michelle Dagnino, iterated recently at her presentation, we too encourage parents and guardians to interact directly with their childrens’ online identities and engage them in meaningful conversations about both their analog and digital social lives. This is a shared responsibility of mutual reinforcement to building 21st Century skills and aptitudes in our learners, and ones that are vital to the health and safety of the children in our care in the real world - and the virtual world.
 
For more information, please view the Government of Canada publication, Digital Citizenship Guide for Parents.
Balance and Innovate
Back

School Information

13415 Dufferin Street King, Ontario L7B 1K5
(905) 833-1220
communications@cds.on.ca
admissions@cds.on.ca
Founded in 1972, The Country Day School is a co-educational private school offering programs in JK-12 and located on 100 acres north of Toronto in King.